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I wish them all a Merry Christmas and every happiness in their new homes. The homes are being built to high energy efficiency and design specifications, including Lifetime Homes and Secured by Design standards, which ensure added security for tenants and flexibility of adaptation if required at a later date. Next story The pampered, petulant, self-pitying Prince: Low running costs, excellent security and a convenient location combined with good design will ensure that our tenants at Glenann Court can continue to live independently in a home of their own as they grow older.

'An utter insult'.

People with long-term support needs, such as learning, physical or sensory disabilities and others experiencing enduring or recurrent mental ill health. The scheme is based in a refurbished, four storey, listed Georgian building at English Street. Pat Doc was often, quite literally, front and centre of them. Such a stance has, in this ever changing political dynamic, the potential to damage the credibility of our unions at a time when we need them bolstered, empowered, active and delivering for workers as the burden of Brexit continues to bear down on us. The new facility will give people living at Harbourview direct access to some of the support and services currently available in the wider North Belfast community. The city's history has been marked by violent conflict between Irish Catholics and Irish Protestants which has caused many working class areas of the city to be split into Catholic and Protestant areas. No child should have to live in a refuge.

The new facility will give people living at Harbourview direct access to some of the support and services currently available in the wider North Belfast community. Rosemary Farrelly who lives at Harbourview said that the Community Hub is a welcome addition to the facilities and services provided by Clanmil at Harbourview: With the play scheme, family fun days and soccer coaching sessions there has been a great buzz about the place and I can feel a real sense of community developing.

We hope that this new Community Hub will be used by all of the residents and that they will really benefit from the services provided. A family fun day organised by local PSNI and Clanmil, who own and manage 23 homes within the Causeway Meadows development, has helped raise awareness among residents of important community safety issues. We hope that as well as having a great time, everyone takes home some useful advice that will help them make their community a safer place to live.

That way, everyone can get involved. The development known as Glenann Court, provides 21 one and two bedroom apartments for applicants from the social housing waiting list.

Congratulations to Clanmil Housing on providing these much needed homes that are specifically designed for people aged 55 and over. I hope that the new residents enjoy life both at Glenann Court and in Glengormley. This facility has been designed with their needs in mind. It means that each resident can live independently in a safe, comfortable environment without feeling isolated, knowing that help is at hand should it be needed.

As well as on-site car parking, a unique feature of the new housing scheme is a communal roof terrace for use by tenants. Low running costs, excellent security and a convenient location combined with good design will ensure that our tenants at Glenann Court can continue to live independently in a home of their own as they grow older. The security is a big plus too. Pauline was winner of the best kept individual garden category. This year the standard of entries was extremely high, and the judges had a difficult job choosing the winners, but the following gardens really stood out: We really appreciate the interest that so many of our tenants show in the gardens at our housing schemes and all of the hard work and effort that goes into making them look so well.

The variety of plants and the amazing colours really impressed our judges. From the mystery of sowing a seed to the bigger picture of changing a landscape, gardening empowers people and transforms communities whether you are planting a window-box or a wide open space. The award for Best Kept Sheltered Housing Area recognises the dedication and hard work of staff and tenants at Glenshesk Court independent living scheme who showcase their pride in their workplace and homes by ensuring they look their very best.

The Best Kept Awards have been in existence since and are now very firmly established as one of the ultimate accolades for housing areas across Northern Ireland, so the residents of Glenshesk should be rightly proud. The awards were presented at a ceremony in the Guild Hall in Londonderry. Congratulations to everyone at Glenshesk Court. The new 41 home development provides 24 three bedroom houses, 16 two bedroom houses and one four bedroom wheelchair bungalow.

Congratulations to Clanmil on this wonderful achievement. This impressive development offers energy-efficient housing with plenty of space for families. I sincerely hope that the residents enjoy their new homes and wish them every success in the future. All have also been constructed to Lifetime Homes and Secured by Design standards which ensure added security and ease of adaptation if required at a later date. During a tour of the scheme the Mayor met residents including Julie Thompson and daughter Autumn who moved into Ballyvester Grove last Christmas.

She was so excited! She just loves having her own room and space to play outside with all her new friends. As well as that, we aim to provide sustainable family homes and have built these houses to a particularly high environmental standard, making them more energy efficient than standard homes and, most importantly, considerably cheaper for tenants to run.

Clanmil Housing recently welcomed tenants to its new social housing scheme at Redwoods in Dunmurry. Both the Semper and Monarch Buildings were originally built for the private housing market but lay unsold for several years before being purchased by Clanmil. Next door, at the Semper Building, our tenants are well settled and already we can see the same sense of community developing here at The Monarch. It is wonderful to see such vibrancy in two buildings that stood empty for so long.

The Clanmil staff here have been wonderful too and have really helped me settle in. The special occasion, organised by Clanmil Housing and the National Museums Northern Ireland, is part of a unique five year Big Lottery project that gives older people living in sheltered housing a chance to take part in workshops and experiences at museum sites to help prompt memories and start conversations.

Brendan Morrissey, Housing Manager at Clanmil said: While the focus is very much on fun, the project really helps with difficult issues such as loneliness and isolation that sadly affect many people in older life. Our tenants are so enthusiastic about the Treasure House sessions and really look forward to their monthly trips. It gives everyone something to look forward to and is always a great talking point when they are back at home. We have the Siobhan Pettit Trio and the Belle Hoppers giving us a musical taste of the age and there will be an Austerity Kitchen offering everyone the chance to taste the ingenious frugal meals that the housewives of the time would have served.

All in all it will be a grand day out! Treasure House has given my lots of new friends and a whole new lease of life. The group is working closely with Clanmil and one of their first projects has been the creation of a community garden at their development.

The project encouraged the tenants to come together, engage with each other in a fun and positive way and really get to know each other. Robin Stewart, who lives at Linen Gardens feels the project has already had a really positive impact on the area.

We hope to see lots more projects just like this one taking place at our housing schemes throughout Northern Ireland in the coming months. The new scheme provides six new semi-detached family homes. I wish all the new tenants of Bayview Park all the best in their new homes. We are very grateful to neighbouring residents and local political representatives for their support in delivering this scheme.

Clanmil Housing Group has just completed a major programme of improvements at The Old Mill, in Larne, which provides 13 self contained apartments and 12 bungalows for older people.

Clanmil tenant, Beth enjoys a little light cooking in her brand new kitchen. Tenants at The Old Mill were given their choice from a range of kitchen designs based on the style of kitchen which they wanted for their home. We all got to pick our own cupboards and worktops and had a great time weighing up all the choices.

When our kitchens were being replaced the workmen covered everything up and left the place tidy at the end of every day. Clanmil Housing Group has just completed a major programme of improvements at The Imperial, in Donaghadee, which provides 24 self contained apartments for older people. Clanmil tenant; Betty Potter enjoying her fabulous new kitchen. The development, when completed, will provide 13 four bedroom houses, 33 three bedroom houses and 18 two bedroom houses and is being built by Clanmil Housing Association with part funding from the Northern Ireland Executive through the Department for Social Development.

Welcoming the new homes Ms Crawford said: Energy efficiency features including a heat recovery system, triple glazing and high levels of insulation will help reduce heating and energy bills for the families who live in the new homes. In addition, all of the homes have been designed to Secured by Design and Lifetime Homes standards, ensuring added security for tenants and flexibility of adaptation if required at a later date.

A significant central green area including play space will be included in the development. Well designed houses and low running costs, combined with space to play, will make this development the perfect place to raise a family. We look forward to welcoming families to their new homes in Spring and to continuing our partnership with the local community and their representatives to make this a great place to live.

The first 22 families moved into the new housing scheme just before Christmas last year followed by a further 19 families in March. The new 41 home scheme provides 24 three bedroom houses, 16 two bedroom houses and 1 four bedroom bungalow and is designed around a large central green space.

All of the properties have good sized gardens making them perfect for families. This impressive development offers energy-efficient housing with plenty of green, open space for families to enjoy.

Every week the kids would ask if we were going to be able to live there. The excitement was incredible. We moved in the very next day. The new homes have been built to high energy-efficiency standards with photovoltaic panels on the roof to generate electricity, a water recycling system to reduce water use and high levels of insulation to help reduce heating and energy bills for the families who live there.

These homes have been designed and built to a very high environmental standard, making them more energy efficient than standard houses and considerably cheaper for our tenants to run. We wish them all many happy years at Ballyvester. We look forward to continuing to work with them to ensure that Ballyvester Grove and Close are great places to live.

This means it is now time to come up with a catchy name for the new scheme. Clanmil has approached the nearby St Oliver Plunkett Primary School and has asked pupils there to put on their thinking caps, test their imaginations and come up with a unique and innovative name. The best entries will be shortlisted and sent to Belfast City Council who will ultimately chose the winning name for the new housing scheme.

Who better to name it than the people who live in the area, some of whom may well soon be living at the new development? The HANA Awards celebrate the most innovative and progressive finance teams and individuals who are rising to considerable financial challenges while continuing to provide great customer service, financial stability and excellent conditions for investment.

The contribution of an individual heading a high performing team can make the critical difference between good and outstanding service. The thing that made Jonathan stand out, was his wide range of achievements for the housing sector. We are very proud of his achievement. This innovative new initiative, which was established in partnership with residents and Clanmil Housing and South Ulster Housing Associations, aims to bring the community together and to emphasise the strong community spirit in this area.

In the past, The Demesne had unfortunately received some bad press due to issues experienced when it first opened. However CRJ has worked tirelessly with the community to resolve these issues through Restorative Approaches. The community want to demonstrate their pride in their area, and have said they won't accept negative perceptions. They feel The Demesne is a great place to live, and they want to make it even better for everyone.

Residents in The Demesne have shown their support for this initiative by signing up to a Community Charter in which they have agreed to use CRJ's Restorative Process should any further issues arise in the area. This early intervention approach will help resolve issues before they escalate or have a negative outcome. Restorative Justice brings people together, and helps them to get to the root of the problem to achieve a long term resolution for everyone.

The residents are extremely supportive of the idea as they feel it is time their area was seen in a more positive light. The people of this area are proud people, and have already discussed ways in which they can further develop the community spirit by setting up a residents group. CRJ are really looking forward to working closely with the residents in the near future, to empower them to stand up for their community and continue to make it a great place to live.

Mr Kibble spoke of the wide uses of Restorative Justice in service provision in England, in particular the housing sector, and emphasised the major benefits of Restorative Justice in reducing re-offending, solving neighbourhood disputes and making communities safer and stronger. The Clanmil Housing Group has launched an innovative new scheme offering its tenants an opportunity and incentive to start saving.

We know this can be difficult as our research has shown that half of all social tenants are currently worried about making ends meet. The development, which was part funded by the Department for Social Development and by the European Investment Bank through The Housing Finance Corporation, has brought the site of the former Bass Brewery back into use for the local community, providing much needed homes and bringing vibrancy and life back into this area of West Belfast.

The success of the scheme is the result of close community and political engagement. Not only does Caffrey Hill provide a really good place to live, but the homes have been designed and built to a very high environmental standard, making them more affordable to run.

The achievements of our finalists and winners will inspire others to provide the best possible services for tenants and communities across this island. Weekly workshops provided a opportunity for older people living with dementia to engage with young people in a positive way and also helped de-stigmatise dementia for the young people.

Initiatives like the Lantern Light project help us to achieve this. This figure is expected to rise to 61, by I extend my congratulations. The scheme is based in a refurbished, four storey, listed Georgian building at English Street. It will house eight young people leaving the care system and will give them support to learn the life skills required to move to more permanent accommodation in the future.

My Department has been able to help put in place not just the bricks and mortar element here, but also the ongoing support through the Supporting People programme.

This impressive facility provides a safe, homely environment for those young people, helping them to make the transition from mainstream care to living more independent lives. The scheme helps young people who are not quite ready to take on the responsibilities of managing a place of their own to get the experience they need while benefitting from the fantastic support that MACS staff provide.

From this scheme, we are providing housing related support and interventions to 75 young people in the community and to eight young people in self contained accommodation here at English Street. Twelve bakers competed for the title of top Clanmil baker and their efforts were judged by local culinary experts including Michelin starred restaurateur Michael Deane and his pastry chef Charlie Chambers.

The first 22 homes at the new scheme were handed over to tenants just in time for Christmas. When completed in Spring this year, the scheme will provide a total of 41 much needed homes including 24 three bedroom houses, 16 two bedroom houses and 1 four bedroom bungalow. The scheme is designed around a large central green space and all of the properties have good sized gardens making them perfect for families. These homes have been designed and built to a very high environmental standard, making them more energy efficient that standard houses and considerably cheaper for our tenants to run.

We hope that they all have a Happy New Year and indeed many happy years to come at Ballyvester Grove. Julie had told Autumn about applying for their own home with Clanmil, but had told her not to get her hopes up in case they were unsuccessful. When Julie heard back from Clanmil saying she and Autumn would be one of 22 families moving into the first phase of the development she decided to keep it a secret so she could surprise her daughter.

On moving in day, Julie collected Autumn from school as usual, but instead of going back to the refuge they took a different route home. Julie told Autumn she had a big surprise for her and as they drove towards Ballyvester Grove, Autumn guessed that her surprise was a home of their own. She was so delighted and so overwhelmed that she was jumping and shouting with excitement.

No child should have to live in a refuge. Introduced in , the Supporting People programme provides a wide range of housing support services to help people sustain their accommodation and live as independently as possible in the community. Among the 26, people in Northern Ireland relying on Supporting People are the frail elderly, people with disabilities and homeless people. Supporting people is a significant public expenditure programme and NICVA wanted to explore if it was value for money.

The figures revealed in this research suggest that simply cutting the Supporting People budget is unlikely to save the government money, and may even result in greater costs overall. The new research confirms that it is worth every penny and saving taxpayers millions through avoidance of costly hospital admissions and reliance on other services.

Service providers are working with government to reform services and make them even more effective. To fulfil its objectives, the NI Executive must ensure Supporting People remains a properly funded, dedicated housing support programme well in to the future. Homeless people, those at risk of losing their home and socially excluded groups, such as substance misusers and ex-offenders. People with long-term support needs, such as learning, physical or sensory disabilities and others experiencing enduring or recurrent mental ill health.

Vulnerable young people at risk and older people who require support to live in their own home, or need a particular type of supported housing. Clanmil has recently purchased the eight new apartments which were originally built for the private market but lay unsold and vacant for the past five years.

We wish them a very merry Christmas and many happy years at Greenwell Mews. Residents living in neighbouring properties were also joined in the fun as a thank you for their patience during the refurbishment. A big thank you to the Community Association for helping us put on this wonderful party. Everyone has really enjoyed the opportunity to get together and celebrate.

We are grateful for the Christmas party provided for new residents and neighbours and look forward to working with Clanmil in the future. A cast of Dickensian characters rolled back the decades at the Ulster Folk and Transport Museum, Cultra to give more than of our older tenants a taste of an authentic Victorian Christmas.

The special occasion, organised by Clanmil Housing and the National Museums Northern Ireland, is part of a unique Big Lottery project that gives older people living in sheltered housing a chance to take part in workshops and experiences at museum sites to help prompt memories and start conversations. The Victorian Christmas event brings the festive season alive with traditional arts and crafts, festive music and period costumes. While the focus is very much on fun, Treasure House has been successful in helping to deal with difficult issues such as loneliness and isolation that sadly do affect many people in older life.

This is all about giving people the opportunity to try something new and exciting from making Egyptian Faience to learning about the history of flight in Northern Ireland. And of course no Christmas party would be complete without a visit from Santa, who is bringing his wife along too!

Clanmil Housing Group today met with local political representatives to outline progress on delivering new social homes within the Derry City Council area, and to call for assistance in identifying and securing land and development opportunities within the City that could facilitate more much needed new homes. Together the four developments will provide a total of new homes for rent by people on the housing waiting list.

These homes are part of ambitious growth plans that will see Clanmil deliver some 2, new homes throughout Northern Ireland over the next three years. We are very grateful to them for their support and assistance. The move is designed to reduce costs, improve efficiency and ensure tenants receive a first class service that keeps their homes in excellent condition. A social clause in the contract will also create a range of apprenticeships, training and work experience opportunities.

We provide local jobs, use local suppliers, support local social enterprises and fund apprenticeship and trainee places for local people.

The homes, a mix of detached and semi-detached properties, have been thoroughly refurbished with modern new kitchens, stylish new white bathroom suites, rewiring, replumbing and Pheonix Gas heating. The many features include uPVC double glazed windows and doors, white panelled internal doors and redecoration throughout. Congratulations to Ryan and Feiona. We hope that they have many happy years in their lovely new home.

There has been lots of Interest in the Mountview Drive homes and we are working through the purchase process with quite a number of buyers at the minute.

Saving for a deposit and securing a mortgage is a real challenge at the minute but the Homeowner scheme has allowed us to buy a share in a fantastic house in the area where we wanted to live.

The refurbishment of the homes at Mountview Drive is scheduled for completion in Spring and there are still a number of properties available. For further details please contact McClelland Salter estate agents on or Clanmil Housing on Or email homeowner clanmil. The aim of the event was to help build community resilience by raising awareness of health and community safety issues and providing advice and information in a friendly, fun environment.

Belfast City Council and the Chest, Heart and Stroke Foundation provided information on keeping physically and emotionally fit at their health and wellbeing stall. Local PSNI officers provided advice on home and personal security, while their spectacular but shocking live road safety demonstration highlighted the dangers of driving and how to minimise the risk of road accidents.

The Simon Community helped raise awareness of drug and alcohol abuse and provided information on support available. Along with the serious messages, there was also an opportunity to enjoy fun and games, including a bouncy castle, cage soccer and art cart. That way, everyone could be involved and enjoy this opportunity to get to know their neighbours better. The road safety demonstration provides a very visible way of reinforcing the importance of keeping within speed limits.

It also highlighted how using a mobile phone when driving can distract your attention and cause accidents. Thanks to everyone involved with the Caffrey event.

Clanmil Housing Association has joined forces with Habitat ReStore in Lisburn to ensure that building materials left over from the construction of its social housing developments are put to good use. Profits are used by Habitat for Humanity to support communities around the world by helping families in need to build homes and their way out of poverty.

Habitat for Humanity's first ReStore in Europe is at Riverside Centre, Lisburn and the range of products on offer incudes kitchens, bathrooms, furniture, bricks, paving, insulation, electrical goods, office furniture, and even the nuts and bolts to hold it all together. You could say that everyone is a winner! We hope that our other contractors will follow their lead and become involved in this very worthwhile project too.

By working together, we are serving the local community by enabling families to improve their home for less and raising vital funds to support families trapped in poverty around the word. The development known as the Semper Building, provides 44 one and two bedroom apartments for applicants from the social housing waiting list. The building was originally built for the private housing market but lay unsold for four years before being purchased by Clanmil. This type of intervention where empty homes are brought back into beneficial use for the community is to be applauded.

Our tenants have settled really well into their new homes and have created a thriving community here. It is great to see such vibrancy in a building that had stood empty for some years.

I just love my apartment. The security is a big plus. When you get a bit older the peace of mind that feeling secure brings is even more important. I feel very lucky to live here surrounded by beautiful woodland. Research shows that loneliness is a major issue for many older people, with more than 66 million hours spent alone by people aged over 65 in Britain each day - equivalent to each person over 65 spending more than days alone each year.

Tenants take part in activities, including arts and crafts, local history, music and dance, that prompt memories, start conversations and help build friendships. By taking part they have opportunities to reminisce about the past and also to enjoy new experiences.

The focus of Treasure House is to enrich the lives of older people and promote the benefits of lifelong learning. We look forward to continuing and developing this important initiative.

Mr Shaw, originally from Belfast, served in and again from to He first enlisted as a rifleman in at age 15 but was sent home from the battlefield when his brother, a military policeman, met him by chance in France. In Mr Shaw joined the 16th battalion of the Royal Irish Rifles and was again posted to France, fighting in battles such as Messines and Passchendaele.

He served in Germany as part of the Army of Occupation for six months after the war ended and returned home in April The tenants and their guests also enjoyed a poppy lunch together and an old time supper dance in the evening. He was a very quiet and unobtrusive man. A new supported housing scheme for young people in Downpatrick threw open its doors today to welcome local people who had been invited to come along and meet their new neighbours. It provides self contained accommodation for young people aged 16 to 21 years who are leaving care or experiencing homelessness.

The Grade B1 listed building has been extensively refurbished by Clanmil to provide two bedsits and six 1 bed apartments along with office and meeting space and overnight facilities for staff. The support provided by MACS helps prepare young people for life in a home of their own in the future.

On site staff support tenants to learn the skills needed to run a home and to be a good neighbour along with employability skills. Each young person is supported to move on to a more permanent home of their own within two years. This new addition to supported housing sees the integration of our existing and established Floating Support Service with a dedicated housing support team.

This new supported living scheme will make a welcome contribution to assisting young people to develop the skills to move on to independent living. The project will significantly contribute to delivering better outcomes and enhance the life opportunities to these young people. Clanmil Housing Association has welcomed the first tenants to its new Dobsons Way family housing development in Bessbrook. The first 11 homes in the 62 unit scheme have been handed over to tenants and a further 13 families will be moving into their new houses this week.

The remaining homes have all been allocated to families on the housing waiting list and will be handed over to them in phases over the summer. Housing Officer Carrie Fegan welcomes Lorna Brown and her son Conor to their new home at Dobsons Way in Bessbrook The homes have been built to the Code for Sustainable Homes high energy efficiency standard and to the Lifetime Homes and Secured by Design standards, which ensure added security for tenants and flexibility of adaptation if required at a later date.

We wish them, and everyone who will live here, many happy years at Dobsons Way. We look forward to continuing to work with them to help our tenants settle into their new homes and new community and to ensure that Dobsons Way is a great place to live. Clanmil ran a competition with Forum members in search of an imaginative name for the new development of 21 apartments. The name, Glenann, was suggested by Isabel Beveridge, and was chosen as the winning name for the new scheme by Newtownabbey Borough Council.

The apartments are being built to high energy efficiency standards. In addition they have been designed to Secured by Design and Lifetime Homes standards, ensuring added security for tenants and flexibility of adaptation if required at a later date. Features of the new building include lifts, covered car parking and a roof terrace for use by the tenants. There were so many brilliant suggestions that it was difficult to chose but I think that Isabel has come up with the perfect name.

The kids love living here. They particularly enjoy the play park and all the open space. The Association is seeking development opportunities in areas of housing need throughout Northern Ireland and wants to hear from landowners who have sites with development potential. The investment is expected to generate almost construction jobs over four-years and support more than associated jobs in the supply chain. Steve Amos, Chair of Clanmil Housing, said: Faced with growing demand for social housing and increasing constraints on statutory funding, our challenge is to find new funding sources that will support continued investment in social housing and make the available public money go further.

The Northern Ireland economy will also benefit from much needed jobs for the local construction industry. The next three years of the Social Housing Development Programme will see housing associations significantly step up output to deliver 2, new homes each year. It is good news for those in need of housing, good news for jobs and good news for the construction sector.

We have been working closely with those involved in the sector for a number of years, offering strong lending support, tailored expertise and have an established working relationship with the Northern Ireland Federation of Housing Associations. Joanna McArdle, Director, Barclays said: Clanmil Housing Association today confirmed details of a new initiative to move first time buyers onto the property ladder. Clanmil plans to release around new and refurbished homes across Northern Ireland over the next three years for purchase through their new Homeowner scheme.

Yet despite falling house prices and record low interest rates, first time buyers face another hurdle in the form of large deposits. It is particularly important that housing associations do what we can to help make homeownership achievable. We are proud to be providing new affordable housing solutions for people in Northern Ireland and appreciate the support of community and elected representatives in this initiative.

The homes are available to buy now and refurbishment work is scheduled to be completed by Spring The fund, which will provide up to affordable homes across Northern Ireland over the next 6 years, is the local application of the Get Britain Building scheme, which was set up by the UK government, utilising Financial Transaction Capital lending, to increase housing supply and support the construction industry.

To help us achieve this target, I can confirm today that three Housing Associations have been successful in bidding for funding from the Affordable Home Loans Fund.

Apex, Clanmil and Oaklee Housing Associations all submitted exciting and innovative proposals that will increase the supply of affordable homes in Northern Ireland, as well as bringing empty homes back into use.

The homes provided through this Fund will provide an all-important step onto the housing ladder for many people, but will also promote economic growth, helping create and maintain jobs in the construction industry. Steve, who has been a member of the Clanmil Board of Management since , takes the top role at the association which provides 3, high quality social and affordable homes throughout Northern Ireland for families and older people.

With almost 40 years experience in the banking and finance sector, Steve is set to lead Clanmil through the implementation of an ambitious three year strategy focusing on growth and community development. Steve has brought invaluable experience and insight to our Board that has helped us continue to deliver great homes and services for our tenants and I am very much looking forward to working with him as Chair to drive forward the next phase in our development.

Steve runs a consultancy business advising small and medium sized businesses on their banking issues. The development, on the site of the former Felden Government Training Centre, will provide 97 new homes for families on the social housing waiting list.

Completion is planned for October Upon completion almost one hundred more families will be able to access good quality accommodation through these 97 new homes. The houses are being built to the most exacting standards. The development team are to be applauded for also designing in good quality recreation space. Going these extra miles to help create and sustain a community in which people will want to live is very much to be welcomed.

All have also been designed to Secured by Design and Lifetime Homes standards, ensuring added security for tenants and flexibility of adaptation if required at a later date. We look forward to continuing work together to make this development a really good place to live and raise a family, with great homes in an excellent environment.

Chair of Clanmil Housing Steve Amos right congratulates Bernard Budde left on coming up the winning name for the new Holywood housing scheme. Also pictured is Louise Green, project worker at the Redburn and Loughview Community Forum, who helped run the naming competition. Clanmil, assisted by the Redburn and Loughview Community Forum, ran a competition for local people in search of an imaginative name for the new development of 37 homes.

The homes are being built to high energy efficiency and design specifications, including Lifetime Homes and Secured by Design standards, which ensure added security for tenants and flexibility of adaptation if required at a later date. A significant central green area will be included in the development which is being designed in consultation with the local community.

We were very impressed by the standard and range of names that were suggested and I think Bernard has come up with the perfect name. The development when completed, will consist of 21 apartments and is being built by Clanmil Housing Association with part funding from the Northern Ireland Executive through the Department for Social Development.

Speaking during a visit to the site, Minister McCausland said: I welcome the construction of these new homes which are being developed in response to a demand for this type of more easily managed accommodation.

This feature in itself will be welcomed by the new tenants. I look forward to seeing the finished scheme in due course. All have been designed to Secured by Design and Lifetime Homes standards, ensuring added security for tenants and flexibility of adaptation if required at a later date. Features of the new building include lifts, underground car parking and a roof terrace for use by the tenants.

Low running costs, excellent security and a convenient location combined with a sense of community will help our tenants continue to live independently in an easy to manage home of their own. We look forward to welcoming our new tenants to their new homes early next year. Over 40 inventive names were put forward by pupils at the school.

Jan Sloan, Development Manager at Clanmil, joined the pupils in their morning assembly and presented the winners with gift vouchers in recognition of their creativity. Brothers James and Daniel Devlin particularly enjoyed a visit from Santa and all of the families received a hamper full of Christmas goodies. As part of the project connections are formed between sheltered housing schemes and schools in their areas to foster long-term and meaningful relationships between the younger and older people.

People living at Bessie Bell Court and the children have enjoyed using the internet for research, interviewing each other and exploring digital photography to create a calendar, while learning valuable social and digital media skills through their interaction.

Today the pupils joined their friends at Bessie Bell Court for a celebration party to mark the successful completion of their calendar.

These newly acquired computer skills will enable more of our tenants to use e-mail and try out activities like on-line shopping and banking. The facilities and services provided at the scheme help support independence, providing companionship, an active lifestyle and security in an easy-to-manage property. This year residents at Ardnaskea Court in Coalisland are also included in the hamper giveaway.

Not only do they provide basic essentials but they also ensure that all of our tenants have a few special treats to enjoy over Christmas. Vineyard do so much for our local community and everyone at Church Mews and Ardnaskea Court is very grateful to the Church for their thoughtfulness and generosity. The facilities and services provided help tenants stay independent as they grow older and to enjoy an active lifestyle. These homes, which lay idle for two years, have been given a new lease of life and taken 20 families off the housing waiting list.

I congratulate Clanmil Housing for having had the foresight to purchase these properties and return them back into use for the benefit of the local community. However, we have seen the positives that can come from acting quickly when the opportunity arises. I would like to wish all the tenants well in their new homes. We wish Jean, her young sons and all of our new tenants at Dog Kennel Close and Crescent, a very peaceful first Christmas in their new home and many happy years to come.

Clanmil was highly commended in the Child Friendly Spaces category of the Healthy Belfast Awards for the green space and play facilities that have been provided as part of the home Caffrey Hill development. Clanmil worked with Playboard and Groundwork NI in designing the community space at Caffrey Hill and the views of pupils from nearby schools and of local residents and community groups were incorporated into the final design.

Providing good homes and a great place to live is about so much more than just bricks and mortar. Community spaces like the central green and playpark at Caffrey Hill help to promote a sense of community and to create settled, harmonious neighbourhoods where people are proud to live and raise their families.

Bernadette Cullen, praised the standard of entries received for the awards. The partnership approach we have developed with statutory bodies and the community sector helps drive our agenda and the commitment these groups make is reflected in the standard of entries for these awards. As well as winners in each category, a number of projects have been commended for their work. We congratulate all those who entered the awards and of course especially our winners.

Clanmil currently owns and manages 3, homes throughout Northern Ireland, a figure that is anticipated to rise to around 5, by The awards showcase the great work carried out across Northern Ireland to brighten up our towns, villages and communities and Caffrey Hill took first place in the medium sized housing area category.

A commemorative plaque was presented to tenants at a Halloween party at Caffrey Hill. The properties which have lain derelict for a number of years, are being totally refurbished by Clanmil with part funding from the Northern Ireland Executive through the Department for Social Development.

Speaking after viewing one of the refurbished homes, Minister McCausland said: I want to congratulate Clanmil Housing, working in tandem with the local community, for their determination and innovative thinking in refurbishing these derelict homes and making them available for social housing once again. One of its primary aims is to bring empty homes across Northern Ireland back into use. This housing refurbishment scheme at Manor Court is a great example of that in action and illustrates the many benefits in bringing empty homes such as these back into use.

I will make further announcements on the Empty Homes Strategy as we move forward in the implementation of the Action Plan. The remaining will be released in phases during with the last in October We are very grateful to them all for their assistance. The new scheme comprising 31 two and three bedroom family homes, and six apartments designed specifically to meet the needs of independent older people, will be built by Clanmil Housing with part funding from the Northern Ireland Executive.

They will be built on a site previously occupied by two blocks of Housing Executive flats. This new planned development will ensure that and also see this part of Holywood revitalised.

It will place an emphasis on housing for families and older people that will contribute to, and help build on, the already strong sense of community in the area. All have been designed to Secured by Design and Lifetime Homes standards which ensure added security for tenants and flexibility of adaptation if required at a later date.

The scheme is planned for completion in September We look forward to welcoming our new tenants next autumn and to continuing our partnership with the local community and their representatives in the delivery and management of these homes. Faced with growing demand for social housing and increasing constraints on statutory funding, our challenge is to find new funding sources that will support continued investment in social housing and make available public money go further.

It is fundamental for our health and well-being, providing better quality of life and increased opportunities for our tenants. We particularly value working with Clanmil as a highly professional housing association and are delighted to have delivered them such a cost-effective funding solution.

Not only will it help in the provision of much needed social housing but it will also provide a real boost to the local construction industry. It is too early to say with certainty how many jobs will be created. However the unique multiplier effect of construction activity will provide significant benefits to the local economy. The new development in Sunningdale Gardens funded by the Northern Ireland Executive and Clanmil Housing Association, provides 46 new family homes and apartments.

This area of North Belfast continues to have a high housing need and Clanmil is to be congratulated for providing these much needed 46 new properties. The mix of family apartments and houses, coupled with apartments for active older people, gives a real community feel to the neighbourhood and has brought new vitality back to this part of Belfast. It is imperative to identify and take on board the aspirations of local people and make things happen for the betterment of that community.

These new homes will make a huge difference to all who now live here. All involved in their provision should be rightly proud of what has been achieved. We are particularly pleased to welcome back home nine people who used to live in the maisonettes that formerly occupied this site and who have been able to move back into their community and these lovely new homes.

In addition, a bus lay-by has been included in the scheme to help address traffic congestion on the Glen Road, a key arterial route into the city. I was also pleased to hear that Clanmil involved local school children and members of the local community in identifying a name for the new development and welcome that community involvement. It is such a pleasure to see this major development so successfully completed and this historic site back in use for the community.

I wish everyone at Caffrey Hill a long and happy life. I congratulate all of those who have contributed to the refurbishment.

The standard of the accommodation I have seen is first class and will provide people with a comfortable and safe place to live. I have a nice bright apartment and my neighbours are so friendly. I feel very much at home here.

Clanmil Housing Association's development of 46 new homes at Sunningdale Gardens in North Belfast has received a national Excellence Award from Premier Guarantee, one of the UK's leading providers of structural warranty and insurance services. The annual Premier Guarantee Excellence Awards recognise the very best of the UK housing market, showcasing the importance of quality construction in improving the standard of living for all. This year over 1, developments throughout the UK were considered across 10 categories.

The developments were judged on the quality of workmanship and build and 56 were selected as winners. The development, which is being built for Clanmil by Hugh J O'Boyle Ltd, will provide 38 family homes and eight apartments. The new homes are being built to a high level of energy efficiency and to Lifetime Homes and Secured by Design standards, ensuring added security for tenants and flexibility of adaptation if required at a later date.

The first phase of the developmnet, comprising 12 houses and 2 apartments, was handed over to tenants in December The remaining 32 homes are scheduled for completion by the beginning of June. Everyone involved in the scheme's design and construction has worked really hard to deliver great homes for our tenants to live in. Our contractor, Hugh J O'Boyle Ltd, has done an excellent job and this award is also a well deserved acknowledgment of the company's high standards and professionalism.

We are very grateful to local community and political representatives who have supported us in delivering this development, and we look forward to continuing to work with them in promoting a good neighbourhood at the scheme.

Clanmil and Hugh J O'Boyle are well deserving winners in a highly competitive category. Older people's champion Esther Rantzen CBE has praised Clanmil Housing for a project it runs at two supported housing schemes in Belfast for older people with dementia. Announcing the winners Esther said: I had plenty of people to do something with but nobody to do nothing with. I found when I wrote about loneliness I was inundated with responses but there is still a stigma attached to it and it is difficult to admit to.

Esther praised the work of the winning entries, which showcase examples of organisations working creatively to overcome the challenges of providing quality housing and support for older people in a testing economic climate. Rebecca Mollart, erosh director of policy and member of the judging panel, said: All the entries demonstrated that, in spite of the changes and challenges faced by older people's housing and support providers, there is still the commitment to continuous improvement and positive practice.

Initiatives like the Record, Recall, Relive project help us to achieve this. Mullan Mews and Sydenham Court are supported housing schemes providing specialised accommodation and support for 55 older people with dementia, enabling them to maintain a high level of independence and social inclusion.

The physical design of the scheme, and the support provided, compensates for the disbility caused by dementia and promotes an active and rewarding lifestyle for the tenants. Award winning homes at Ardilea Close in Downpatrick The Housing Council Awards recognise and celebrate the achievements of people and organisations who have excelled in delivering effective, efficient, quality housing. Ardilea Close took first place in the Councillor Jim Speers Special Award which is presented each year to the best housing association scheme constructed within the past three years.

The scheme, which was completed by Clanmil in October , provides 13 houses and six apartments all of which have been built to high energy efficiency levels, with double glazed windows designed to maximise natural light and highly rated insulation fitted as standard.

The houses also have solar roof panels fitted to assist water heating. We are also very grateful to local community and political representatives who worked with us to deliver this development, and who continue to support us in promoting a good neighbourhood at the scheme. The new homes are scheduled for completion in Spring and are being built to high energy efficiency and design specifications, including Lifetime Homes and Secured by Design standards, which ensure added security for tenants and flexibility of adaptation if required at a later date.

This housing development is a very good example of the work that can be done, and the provision that can be created when the Department for Social Development, Housing Associations and the local community work together. Brothers Darragh and Declan Gallagher, whose family recently moved into a new home at Caffrey Hill, enjoying the new play park at the scheme that opened last week.

Belfast today is the capital of Northern Ireland. Belfast was throughout its modern history a major commercial and industrial centre, but the late 20th century saw a decline in its traditional industries, particularly shipbuilding.

The city's history has been marked by violent conflict between Irish Catholics and Irish Protestants which has caused many working class areas of the city to be split into Catholic and Protestant areas. In recent years the city has been relatively peaceful and major redevelopment has occurred, especially in the inner city and dock areas.

The Belfast area has been occupied since at least the Iron Age. The Giant's Ring , a 5,year-old henge , is located near the city, and evidence of Bronze and Iron Age occupation have been found in the surrounding hills. The original settlement of Belfast was little more than a village, [2] based around the marshy ford where the River Lagan met the River Farset , which today would be where High Street meets Victoria Street. The Ford of Belfast existed as early as , when a battle was fought at the site.

George's is built on the site of an ancient chapel used by pilgrims crossing the water. The earliest mention of the Chapel of the Ford is in the papal taxation rolls of A castle was built by the English to protect and dominate this position.

It was located at what is now Castle Place, where several roads meet at the top of High Street. It was first destroyed in by Edward le Bruce , who came to Ireland on the invitation of O'Neill and other Irish chieftains. Recent archaeological excavations inside the former Woolworth's building beside Castle Place discovered a "gully trench" with medieval pottery dating the bottom-most strata highlighting physical evidence that had until then been relatively absent for medieval occupation of the town.

The discoveries would have been situated on the south bank of the River Farset. Timbers were also recovered from the Ann Street end of the building which dated to the 16th century.

Until the late 16th century most of the land surrounding Belfast was still in the hands of the O'Neill clan. By letters patent, Chichester was created Baron Chichester of Belfast. The new importance of Belfast was demonstrated when in the town was constituted a corporation , of a sovereign , twelve burgesses and a commonalty , with the privilege of sending two representatives to parliament. Despite Belfast's seemingly growing significance to the English monarchy, it was still very much a small settlement at this stage.

John Speed 's map of Ireland marks Belfast as an insignificant village, [9] and the patent styles it a town, or village. In [NB 1] Thomas Wentworth , then Lord Deputy of Ireland , purchased from Carrickfergus its trade monopolies namely, one third import duty compared with other locations in the kingdom and bestowed them upon Belfast. The customs house was also relocated to Belfast at around the same time, and new trade flooded into the town, much to the expense of the prosperity of Carrickfergus.

Throughout the 17th century, Belfast was settled by English and Scottish settlers as part of the Plantation of Ulster , of which Arthur Chichester was a major proponent.

During the aftermath of the Rebellion , the Scottish parliament sent an army to Ulster to put down the unrest. Many of these soldiers settled in Belfast after the Irish Confederate Wars. During the Williamite War in Ireland Belfast changed hands twice. Later the same year a large Williamite expeditionary force arrived in Belfast Lough landing and taking the major towns of the area before laying siege to Carrickfergus. Belfast was captured by a detachment led by Henry Wharton after the Jacobites had abandoned it without a fight.

Combined with their failure at the Siege of Derry , Schomberg's landing and march to Dundalk Camp led to the Jacobites withdrawing from most of Ulster and Belfast remained in Williamite hands to the end of the war. Belfast thrived in the 18th century as a merchant town, importing goods from Great Britain and exporting the produce of the linen trade.

Linen at the time was made by small producers in rural areas. The town was also a centre of radical politics, partly because its predominantly Presbyterian population was discriminated against under the penal laws , and also because of the influence of the Scottish Enlightenment. Belfast saw the founding of the Irish Volunteers in and the Society of United Irishmen in —both dedicated to democratic reform, an end to religious discrimination and greater independence for Ireland.

As a result of intense repression however, Belfast radicals played little or no role in the Irish Rebellion of Two major developments at the time altered the appearance of Belfast's centre: In the 19th century, Belfast became Ireland's pre-eminent industrial city with linen, heavy engineering, tobacco and shipbuilding dominating the economy.

Belfast, located at the western end of Belfast Lough and at the mouth of the River Lagan , was an ideal location for the shipbuilding industry, which was dominated by the Harland and Wolff company which alone employed up to 35, workers and was one of the largest shipbuilders in the world.

Migrants to Belfast came from across Ireland, Scotland and England, but particularly from rural Ulster, where sectarian tensions ran deep. The same period saw the first outbreaks of sectarian riots, which have recurred regularly since.

For 12 July , Orange Institution parades in Belfast were banned, leading to demonstrations and serious rioting in the city. This spread to County Armagh and County Tyrone , lasting several days and resulting in at least 20 deaths. On 12 July , confrontations between crowds of Catholics and Protestants turned into ten days of rioting, with many of the police force joining the Protestant side. There were also riots in Derry , Portadown and Lurgan.

In the summer of , about 30, Nationalists held a demonstration at Hannahstown in Belfast, campaigning for the release of Fenian prisoners, but leading to another series of riots between Catholics and Protestants in the city.

In June , Protestants celebrated the defeat of the Home Rule Bill, leading to rioting again on the streets of Belfast and the deaths of seven people, with many more injured. In the same year, following the Twelfth Orange Institution parades, clashes took place between Catholics and Protestants, and also between Loyalists and police.

Thirteen people were killed in a weekend of serious rioting which continued sporadically until mid-September and an official death toll of 31 people. In the second half of the 19th century, the city underwent much change. It had started to overtake Carrickfergus as the main settlement in the area.

So much so that, at some point, Carrickfergus Lough was renamed as Belfast Lough. Industries were set up and concentrated on Belfast, which resulted in a high level of internal migration to the town.

Though Belfast had seen some growth before that. Of the migrants, a fair proportion were Roman Catholics from the west of Ulster, settling mostly in the west of Belfast. Until that point Belfast had been overwhelmingly Protestant. Towards the end of the 18th century, money was raised by collections from both the Presbyterian and Church of Ireland congregations of the town and, together with monies donated by Protestant businessmen, enough was raised to erect the first Roman Catholic church in Belfast — St.

Mary's in Chapel Lane. A couple of years later, at the opening and first mass on 30 May , the mostly Presbyterian 1st Belfast Volunteer Company paraded to the chapel yard and gave the parish priest a guard of honour , with many of the Protestants of Belfast also present and sharing the event. At the time, the Roman Catholic population of Belfast was only around four hundred.

By that number had risen to some 45, In George Hamilton Chichester, 3rd Marquess of Donegall a descendant of the Chichester family built a new castle on the slopes of Cavehill above the town.

The new Belfast Castle was designed by Charles Lanyon and its construction was completed in Although the county borough of Belfast was created when it was granted city status by Queen Victoria in , [17] the city continues to be viewed as straddling County Antrim and County Down with the River Lagan generally being seen as the line of demarcation.

The city's importance was evidenced by the construction of the lavish City Hall , completed in As noted, since around its population included many Catholics, who originally settled in the west of city, around the area of today's Barrack Street which was known as the "Pound Loney".

West Belfast remains the centre of the city's Catholic population in contrast with the east of the city which remains predominantly Protestant. Other areas of Catholic settlement have included parts of the north of the city, especially Ardoyne and the Antrim Road and the Markets area immediately to the south of the city centre. Conditions for the new working class were often squalid, with much of the population packed into overcrowded and unsanitary tenements.

The city suffered from repeated cholera outbreaks in the midth century. Conditions improved somewhat after a wholesale slum clearance programme in the s. Belfast saw a bitter strike by dock workers organised by radical trade unionist Jim Larkin , in The dispute saw 10, workers on strike and a mutiny by the police, who refused to disperse the striker's pickets. Eventually the Army had to be deployed to restore order.

The strike was a rare instance of non-sectarian mobilisation in Ulster at the time. Unionists, led by Edward Carson raised a militia, the Ulster Volunteers , to resist this, by force if necessary. The political crisis heightened tensions in Belfast and rioting took place in city in July of that year. It was then proposed that Ireland would be partitioned, with unionists demanding that the six north-eastern counties of Ireland four of which had Protestant majorities would be excluded from Home Rule.

Home Rule and partition had been accepted in principle by , but were postponed until the end of the First World War. Following the end of the War and radical Irish nationalist politics after the Easter Rising of , the issues of Irish independence and the partition of Ireland again came to prominence. Under the Government of Ireland Act , Ireland was partitioned into Protestant-dominated Northern Ireland the six most-Protestant counties of the province of Ulster and the Catholic-dominated rest of the country.

The period immediately before and after partition was marked by major sectarian conflict in Belfast, and some areas became much more dominated by one religious group. Although coinciding with the Irish War of Independence , the Belfast conflict had a nature all of its own. The conflict began in Belfast in July On 21 July , rioting broke out in the city, starting in the shipyards and later spreading to residential areas.

The violence was partly in response to the IRA killing of a northern RIC police officer Gerald Smyth , in Cork, and partly because of competition over jobs due to the high unemployment rate. In response to this violence, southern nationalists imposed a boycott on goods produced in Belfast.

In Northern Ireland, an auxiliary police force, the Ulster Special Constabulary was recruited for counter-insurgency purposes. The year saw three major flare ups in Belfast.

Just before the Truce that formally ended the Irish War of Independence on 11 July, Belfast suffered a day of violence known at the time as ' Belfast's Bloody Sunday '.

This sparked a day of ferocious fighting in west Belfast on the following day, Sunday 10 July, in which 16 civilians; eleven Catholics and five Protestants, lost their lives and houses were destroyed. Another four died over the following two days [24] The second spike in violence came in three days from 29 August to 1 September, in which twenty people were killed and the third in November, when more than thirty died.

Images: speed dating belfast northern ireland

speed dating belfast northern ireland

The scheme in English Street, which provides self-contained accommodation for young people aged 16 to 21 years who are leaving care or experiencing homelessness, took first place in the Councillor Jim Speers Special Award. This Morning viewers shocked by model wearing VERY ill-fitting knickers as she suffers a wardrobe malfunction The show must go on! Steve Amos, Chair of Clanmil Housing said:

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Archived from the original on 19 December As a result of intense repression however, Belfast radicals played little or no role in the Irish Rebellion of

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